Big Innovation Centre, Big Innovation CentreProfessor Birgitte Andersen, PhD Economics, and Co-Founder and CEO
Science fiction has always been a telescope for futuristic imagination, whether it is Asimov’s ‘The Robots of Dawn,’ which envisioned the role of artificial intelligence, big data, and robots in ultramodern societies, or Neal Stephenson’s ‘Cryptonomicon,’ where the author formulated the concept of free information exchange. Over the years, many trailblazers have taken inspiration from these ideas and brought forth innovative technologies from the mind’s eye into reality.

However, the assimilation of these technologies into the business sphere has not always been smooth. Even today, developers, as well as investors, face various challenges surrounding the implementation of AI, blockchain, and other technologies. The biggest roadblock that is hindering from achieving the complete potential of these technologies is the apparent disconnect between the various stakeholders, be it industry integrators, government policymakers, or the citizens. In order to bridge this gap and facilitate seamless partnerships between the various stakeholders, Big Innovation Centre, an innovation thinktank and technology consultancy, is setting a common stage for knowledge-sharing. The organisation is equipping technology developers, integrators, and regulators with robust and actionable strategies to unlock the myriad of possibilities offered by the emerging technologies and co-create a sustainable future together.

Founded in 2011, Big Innovation Centre is one of the fastest-growing technology and innovation networks in the world. It functions on corporate sponsorship and individual membership. By bringing attention to the role of digital transformation, intangible assets, and creative disruption, the company aligns technological opportunities, business model strategies, and national plans while promoting knowledge sharing through open projects, networking, communications, and showcasing.

Aligning Ideas. Unlocking Opportunities.

“To understand the possibilities and risks of emerging technologies like AI, blockchain, and others, we must bring together both vision and knowledge,” says Professor Birgitte Andersen, PhD Economics, and co-founder and CEO of Big Innovation Centre. To make this happen, the company acts like a ‘living lab,’ coordinating evidence from the entire technological ecosystem. Whether it is healthcare service, data governance, technology adoption, or supply chain management, the company believes that a collaborative path is the only way that will lead to sustainability, as technology impacts every stakeholder in society.

By becoming a member of the Big Innovation Centre, one gets access to a peer network of business leaders and global executives of major corporations, entrepreneurs, investors, academics, politicians, and policymakers. Thus, by exchanging industry knowledge, engaging in thought leadership, and sharing insights, the members get the opportunity to impact the financial, social, political, and regulatory future of the business landscape with AI, blockchain, and other emerging technologies.

Besides, the members are also granted access to exclusive events, showcases, receptions, topic debates, evidence forums, and Big Innovation Centre’s legendary annual ‘Spring Party.’

By becoming a member of the Big Innovation Centre, one gets access to a peer network of business leaders and global executives of major corporations, entrepreneurs, investors, academics, politicians, and policymakers

With themes like ‘Scale-up Party,’ ‘Global Innovation Hub Party,’ and ‘Back to the Future Party,’ the organisation hosts fun yet informative gatherings, providing an engaging networking platform for thought leaders from the industrial and political spectrum.

Steering Creative Disruption and Social Movements

Big Innovation Centre is taking the helm of innovative thinking and directing it further towards a more viable and prosperous tomorrow with its new future-facing programme ‘Creative Disruption and Social Movements.’ The high-level thought leadership programme is designed to analyse the current technological transformation and come up with concrete, future-proof strategies for the benefit of business and society. As a part of this programme, the Big Innovation Centre has deployed a global board to assemble the top disrupters in technology and innovation, along with the top leaders of social movements.

Elaborating on the importance of this programme, Birgitte says, “We live in an era of intense creative disruption and social movement. Businesses and individuals who lead these disruptions need to be a part of the technological evolution as do politicians and policymakers because their role will inevitably impact the various dimensions of business.”

Indeed, truer words were never spoken. Right now,even amidst the global lockdown, the world is being witness to several social and technological movements in the UK, Europe, Americas, Middle East, India, Central Asia, and the Far East. And the COVID-19 is dramatically redefining how social movements are flourishing, whether it’s the Extinction Rebellion, the Happiness Movement, Black Lives Matter, Feminist movements, Opioid crisis, Anthropocene, and so on. These social movements are, in turn, changing the workplace and the business and social landscape by large, and it will only gain more prominence in the new normal.

Big Innovation Centre is poised to play a critical role in facilitating the course for a better future by bringing together a unique band of original doers and practitioners from worldwide to brainstorm innovative, tech-led, creative solutions to the world’s most pressing problems. The ‘Innovators Board’ introduced by the Big Innovation Centre will pave the way for more purposeful societies all over the world.

Laying the Foundation of Trust

Owing to the role played by Big Innovation Centre in shaping the technology-driven societies, the UK Parliament has appointed the organisation as the all-party parliamentary group (APPG) secretariat for discussing the clout of AI implementations since 2017 and blockchain technology since 2018. Currently, these are the only APPGs permitted by the Sergeant of Arms to film APPG evidence sessions in the Parliament to publish online.

Big Innovation Centre was also selected by No 10 and UK trade and investment (UKTI) under the Department of International Trade to showcase their open innovation ecosystem and vision for 2025 (Fast Forward 2025) for the UK G8 Summit-delegation on 14 June 2013. By developing a visionary cartoon film and TEDx type of talks, Big Innovation Centre showcased a co-created world in 2025, which described a positive vision of the future, where the Internet of Things, Big data, and sensor technology can make us healthier, wealthier, and moreenergy-efficient.

Along with the government, the relevancy of the Big Innovation Centre’s role is also being recognised by companies across various industries. Today, about 30 percent of the organisation’s revenue comes from the computer software sector, and 25 percent from financial services. Professional services, including management consulting and legal attributes to around 20 percent of the revenue, whereas research, innovation, and technology, make up for 15 percent of the company’s revenue. Along with these, the organisation also draws around 10 percent of its revenue from manufacturing, energy supplies, media, government, and trade associations.

Lightning the Path Towards a Successful Tech-Driven Future

Undoubtedly, AI and blockchain are transforming the business world, and the Big Innovation Centre’s network is at the forefront of this change. The organisation will continue to foster future-facing and cutting-edge research and thought leadership to clear the path for companies that show technological promise. With the aim of building long-lasting communities of businesses, innovators, policy leaders, and entrepreneurs, Big Innovation Centre will introduce new learning opportunities while helping its members to be future-proof and future-ready.